Medium 9781475811339

Jsl Vol 12-N1

Views: 827
Ratings: (0)

The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

List price: $39.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (6/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

4 Articles

Format Buy Remix

The Penetration of Educational Leadership Texts by Revelation and Prophecy: The Case of Stephen R. Covey

ePub

FENWICK W. ENGLISH

ABSTRACT: The writings of Stephen R. Covey and his best-selling work, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, are beginning to be included in a broad range of texts marketed to educational leaders, including textbooks for the formal preparation of school administrators at the university level. Despite its unprecedented popularity, Covey’s work is not research based nor is it scientific. Its epistemological claims are grounded in Christian prophecy and revelation. Covey’s work neglects to meet even the most minimal standards of academic scholarship and should not be the content of any curriculum that professes to be based on empirically verified science. As long as educational practitioners and professors of educational administration remain unaware of the deeply metaphysical nature of Covey’s works, they will continue to mistake or substitute revelation and prophecy for science. In so doing they run the risk of forfeiting claims about the “scientific preparation” of educational administrators, which has long been the hallmark of professional schools.

See All Chapters

Leadership and Special Education: A Study of Power Shifts

ePub

LYNN H. DOYLE

ABSTRACT: The reauthorized Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) signals dramatic changes for all facets of education. This autoethnography investigates the diagnostic and placement practices in an urban school district. Analysis revealed that although the reauthorization of IDEA opens the door to transformation, educators in this study interpreted the law in ways that constrained their work. Discussion focuses on how administrators and staff members who understand the intentions of the reauthorized IDEA might view it less as a mandate and more as an opportunity to shift power.

The passage of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (EAHCA) in 1975 marked a turning point for individuals with disabilities. Prior to 1975, over one half of students with disabilities were not receiving appropriate education services, and of these, approximately one million were excluded entirely from public schools (20 U.S.C. 1400 (b)(1)-(5)). Over the years, individuals with disabilities made considerable gains in accessing services. The EAHCA guaranteed a free, appropriate public education to all children who had documented special education needs. Procedural safeguards were included to ensure due process. Additionally, many individual states developed their own special education laws, sometimes expanding the services mandated by federal laws. The EAHCA, retitled the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 1990, was amended five times, adding protections for children with disabilities.

See All Chapters

Women High School Principals: Perspectives on Role Conflict, Role Commitment, and Job Satisfaction

ePub

ELLEN WEXLER ECKMAN

ABSTRACT: This study is an investigation of women high school principals in terms of the challenges they face, role conflicts they experience, their role commitment, and their job satisfaction. The purpose is to describe women high school principals addressing the issue of the continued underrepresentation of women in the high school principalship. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from women high school principals in Illinois, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. The findings indicate that role conflict impacts career decisions—respondents delayed entering the high school principalship until the demands of raising their children had lessened. Role conflict is inversely related to job satisfaction; the more role conflict, the lower the level of job satisfaction. The number of students in the school affects job satisfaction and role conflict. Women today may have more career mobility than in the past. Encouragement and mentoring are key factors in enabling women to become high school principals.

See All Chapters

SPECIAL SECTION: STUDENT PERSPECTIVES ON SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

ePub

JIM ANSALDO

JESSE GOODMAN

ABSTRACT: In response to the tremendous changes that the contemporary field of curriculum studies has undergone, this article explores the ways in which the faculty and students at Indiana University have reconceptualized the doctoral curriculum studies program during the past decade. We begin with a portrayal of the structural manifestations of our doctoral program and then turn our attention to the way in which this program is currently experienced by at least some of our students. Our purpose here is not to suggest that we have “found the answer,” but rather to invite an interchange with others interested in doctoral education within our program and others in the field of education.

As Pinar and his colleagues (1995) recently demonstrated, the field of curriculum studies has undergone tremendous changes during the past three decades. These alterations have encouraged us to rethink the very essence of our field. For example, the topics of study that are currently considered important among curriculum scholars have grown exponentially during this time, as have the ways in which we conduct our scholarship. This turn of events also has prompted many of us to ask several questions related to our doctoral program in curriculum studies. Should we substantively alter the courses offered in curriculum studies? What should students experience while they are enrolled in our program? What type of relationship should a program try to encourage among doctoral students and between students and faculty? How should new graduate students be introduced to doctoral studies? What does it mean to “become” a scholar and professor of curriculum studies? Should long-standing conventions such as the qualifying exam and dissertation be altered in significant ways? In what ways, if at all, should the dramatic changes in the field be reflected in the way curriculum studies doctoral students are educated? In response to these and other questions, this article explores the ways in which the faculty and students at Indiana University have reconceptualized the doctoral curriculum studies program during the past decade. Our purpose here is not to suggest that we have “found the answer,” but rather to invite an interchange with others interested in doctoral education within our program and other programs in the field of education. We begin with a portrayal of the structural manifestations of our doctoral program and then turn our attention to the way this program is currently experienced by at least some of our students.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000037072
Isbn
9781475811339
File size
830 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata