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Jsl Vol 11-N4

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The Journal of School Leadership is broadening the conversation about schools and leadership and is currently accepting manuscripts. We welcome manuscripts based on cutting-edge research from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological orientations. The editorial team is particularly interested in working with international authors, authors from traditionally marginalized populations, and in work that is relevant to practitioners around the world. Growing numbers of educators and professors look to the six bimonthly issues to: deal with problems directly related to contemporary school leadership practice teach courses on school leadership and policy use as a quality reference in writing articles about school leadership and improvement.

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5 Articles

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Educating Leaders for Proactive Involvement in Policy Development

ePub

CYNTHIA J. REED
FRANCES K. KOCHAN

ABSTRACT: Schools and education in general face intense scrutiny, particularly as states enact high stakes accountability legislation that measures and judges performance. This has led to increased stress for school administrators who have typically had little voice in framing these policies but who are responsible for meeting state mandated standards. This article describes the steps taken in a university educational leadership program to foster the proactive engagement of educational leaders in the policy arena.

The last decade has been filled with calls for educational reform. These calls are often accompanied by expanded legislation to control, structure, and evaluate schools (Murphy, 1993; Stallings & Kowalski, 1990). Most of these legislative mandates create policies focused on increased accountability. Often they include high-stakes measures to assess student and personnel performance, structural and governing arrangements such as site-based management, and curricular standards. These mandates are handed down to schools and school systems that then become responsible for their implementation. State legislative bodies, acting through their departments of education, generally assume the power for monitoring and enforcing these dictates yet have no direct responsibility for policy implementation (Taylor, Rizvi, Lingard, & Henry, 1997). Although K–12 schools have received the brunt of public scrutiny, higher education has also been increasingly under the microscope of public and political criticism (Holmes Group, 1990; Murphy, 1993), particularly for their perceived failure to properly prepare administrators and teachers for these changing contexts.

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The Implications of Raising One’s Voice in Educational Leadership Doctoral Programs: Women’s Stories of Fear, Retaliation, and Silence

ePub

DANA RAPP
SILENT X
SILENT Y

ABSTRACT: We wanted to understand if and how educational leadership students are encouraged to address patriarchy in their doctoral programs. More specifically, we wanted to more fully understand why women may choose to avoid issues of gender injustice in their coursework and dissertations. We interviewed four women who are currently enrolled in educational leadership programs and hold positions of leadership in public schools in Ohio.

Whether it is the color line, the sexual identity code, or the glass ceiling, tensions continue to simmer below the surface of many educational practices, policies, and training programs. Educators from historically marginalized groups continue to contend that white privilege, heterosexism, economic justice, and patriarchy are life or death issues that go unexamined in much of their training. Educational leadership is a prime example.

The logics, skills, and language of status quo helmsmanship inevitably dwarf the identities of many leadership students and programs. The ability to desensitize, disobey one’s history, and remain silent may be essential for doctoral advancement for some students. If there is little or no support for leadership students to pursue issues of sensitivity, history, identity, and voice in their doctoral studies, we believe there is a much greater possibility that these issues will never be addressed in the institutions that they will eventually lead.

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An Investigation of Computer-Based Simulations for School Crisis Management

ePub

EDWARD DEGNAN
WILLIAM BOZEMAN

ABSTRACT: This article describes the research and development associated with creating a computer-based simulation used for training school personnel in crisis management. Specifically, the paper addresses the data collection and analysis involved in developing a simulated event, the systems requirements for the simulation, and a case study of application and use of the completed simulation.

In order to improve the effectiveness of training for teachers and school administrators, a realistic training environment is required so that these professionals can practice the necessary skills to deal with real-world crisis situations. The use of simulations within the area of crisis management can improve a school’s ability to deal with crisis situations. Simulations permit school employees to rehearse scenarios, preplan team activities, practice decision making, coordinate with other local agencies, and manage resources.

SCHOOL VIOLENCE

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Promoting Social Justice and Caring in Schools and Communities: The Unrealized Potential of the Cohort Model

ePub

RAYMOND A. HORN, JR.

ABSTRACT: The problem of the efficacy of educational leadership as a promoter of just and caring change in schools and communities is explored in the context of educational leadership preparation practices. An exploration of this problem is based on the premise that despite the use of innovative instructional methods, in most cases current preparation programs merely reproduce the use of modernistic administrative practices and organizational structures. Here, the cohort model is identified as a means to promote just, caring, and relevant educational leadership. After a review of the benefits, drawbacks, and the nature of the use of cohorts in leadership preparation programs, a cohort structure is examined that will prepare educational leaders who are able to promote just and caring change in our postmodern communities.

As a professor in a doctoral educational leadership preparation program that utilizes a cohort model, I am concerned about the distinct possibility that our program has no significant impact beyond that of our students’ individual development as educational leaders. One way of comforting myself might be to adopt the viewpoint that our primary responsibility extends only as far as our students, and any beneficial change that occurs in school communities and in society at large is the responsibility of our students as educational leaders. However, that is not the position that drives this research—it is that the end state of promoting egalitarian change characterized by an ethic of caring in school communities and society at large must be the guiding principle in the organization of leadership preparation programs. I will argue that educational leadership programs utilizing cohort groups have the potential, if implemented appropriately, to serve this end. This position will be presented as a theoretical, conceptual, and ideological argument, rather than through an empirical study.

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The Reform of Administrator Preparation at Stanford: An Analytic Description

ePub

MICHAEL AARON COPLAND

ABSTRACT: The most recent wave of reform in the preparation of school leaders has been underway for more than a decade. Clear description of successful program efforts can provide the field of educational leadership with an understanding of promising new and innovative directions in preparation. This article provides an analytic case description of one reform-oriented administrator preparation program, the Prospective Principals Program at Stanford University. The voices of students, graduates, and program faculty are incorporated to illustrate and document the evolution of the program. Promising aspects of the program, including implications in six specific areas, are highlighted in an effort to contribute to the growing knowledge base emerging from reform efforts in preparation.

In the late 1980s, on the heels of calls for education reform heard earlier in the decade, the preparation of school administrators surfaced anew as a concern in educational administration literature (c.f., Griffiths, Stout, & Forsythe, 1988a; Hallinger & Murphy, 1991; Murphy, 1990, 1993a; Murphy & Hallinger, 1987). The report of the National Commission on Excellence in Educational Administration entitled Leaders for Tomorrow’s Schools, attempted to capture the emerging concerns, recommending that administrator preparation be restructured to more closely resemble preparation programs of other professions such as medicine, which emphasize theoretical and clinical knowledge, applied research, and supervised practice (Griffiths et al., 1988a; Reynolds, 1994).

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