Medium 9781442229235

Pro Ecclesia Vol 20-N1: A Journal of Catholic and Evangelical Theology

Views: 1061
Ratings: (0)
Pro Ecclesia is a quarterly journal of theology published by the Center for Catholic and Evangelical Theology. It seeks to give contemporary expression to the one apostolic faith and its classic traditions, working for and manifesting the church's unity by research, theological construction, and free exchange of opinion. Members of its advisory council represent communities committed to the authority of Holy Scripture, ecumenical dogmatic teaching and the structural continuity of the church, and are themselves dedicated to maintaining and invigorating these commitments. The journal publishes biblical, liturgical, historical and doctrinal articles that promote or illumine its purposes.

Ways to subscribe:
Call toll-free: 800-273-2223
Email: journals@rowman.com

For back-issues, please contact journals@rowman.com

Editorial inquiries:
Joseph Mangina, joseph.mangina@utoronto.ca
Submissions should be sent by email attachment in Microsoft Word, double-spaced, with identifying marks removed for the purposes of blind peer review.

Book review inquiries:
Chad Pecknold, pecknold@cua.edu

Advertising inquiries:
Charles Roth, Jr., charlie@spireads.com

Subscription inquiries:
journals@rowman.com
ISSN: 1063-8512

List price: $19.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Cardinal Willebrands’s Contributions to Catholic Ecumenical Theology

ePub

Cardinal Willebrands’s Contributions to Catholic Ecumenical Theology

Jared Wicks, S.J.

The centenary of the birth of Johannes Willebrands, who played central roles in the ecumenical engagement of the Catholic Church, was marked on 4 September 2009. The present essay presents four topics of ongoing theological importance that Willebrands expounded from the platform given him by the positions he held.1

From 1952 to 1963, Willebrands coordinated the Conférence catholique pour les questions œcuméniques, which promoted exchanges and collaboration among the pioneers of Catholic ecumenism and of the theological renewal undergirding Catholic ecumenical initiatives.2 The conference’s nine three-day meetings involved some seventy-five theologians, with papers, for example, on themes of the Assemblies of the World Council of Churches (Evanston 1954 and New Delhi 1961) and on issues relevant to the Second Vatican Council.3 In regular visits to Rome, Willebrands reported on the conference activities and its future programs to Cardinal Alfredo Ottaviani of the Holy Office and to Fr. Augustin Bea, S.J., of the Pontifical Biblical Institute, with the latter being until 1958 a conduit to Pope Pius XII. Through the Catholic Conference’s meetings and papers, one can say that Willebrands underwent an advanced theological education, on which he then drew in the varied contexts of his lectures as an apostle and interpreter of Catholic ecumenical commitment.4

See All Chapters

“But Who Laid Hands on Him?” Apostolicity and Methodist Ecclesiology

ePub

“But Who Laid Hands on Him?” Apostolicity and Methodist Ecclesiology

Douglas M. Koskela

Among the more infamous pieces in the corpus of Charles Wesley’s verse is the “Epigram” he penned in response to his brother’s decision to preside at ministerial ordinations in 1784. In particular, when John Wesley “set apart” Thomas Coke as superintendent for Methodists in America, Charles articulated a sharp response:

So easily are Bishops made

By man’s, or woman’s whim?

W—— his hands on C—— hath laid,

but who laid hands on Him?

Hands on himself he laid, and took

An Apostolic Chair:

And then ordain’d his Creature C——

His Heir and Successor.1

Charles’s thinly veiled invective serves to illustrate the ecclesiological ambiguity of the Methodist movement as it developed gradually and perhaps hesitantly into a church. A central concern of Charles’s in the “Epigram” is apostolicity, one of the nota ecclesiae in the creed of Nicaea-Constantinople. As with many ecclesiological categories, the notion of apostolicity has proven to be rather complex in the Methodist tradition. In this, of course, Methodists are not alone. The concept of “apostolicity” was forged in a context of theological controversy.2 Long after those particular controversies have dissipated, and with

See All Chapters

A Luther Wesley Could Appreciate? toward convergence on Sanctification

ePub

A Luther Wesley Could Appreciate? toward convergence on Sanctification

William P. McDonald

Martin Luther was not among John Wesley’s favorite theologians.1 Rather, the founder of Methodism accused Luther of advocating a “crazy solafideism.” Complained Wesley:

Many who have spoken and written admirably well concerning justification had no clear conception, nay, were totally ignorant, of the doctrine of sanctification. Who has wrote [sic] more ably than Martin Luther on justification by faith alone? And who was more ignorant of the doctrine of sanctification, or more confused in his conceptions of it?2

He understood Luther to say that forgiven sinners are free to go on sinning. God condemns sin but offers no change in sinners’ affections. They cannot help what they do. God’s relationship to them is completely external and merely permissive, children constantly the object of God’s ire in the law and God’s prodigal forgiveness in the gospel. Is there anything more?

See All Chapters

Salvation and the Certitude of Faith: Luther on Assurance

ePub

Salvation and the Certitude of Faith: Luther on Assurance

Sven Grosse

The “Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification” by the Lutheran World Federation and the Catholic Church from 1997 includes a position, presented as an essential teaching, on the subject of certitude (assurance of salvation). The following is found under Point 4.6:

(34) We confess together that the faithful can rely on the mercy and promises of God. In spite of their own weakness and the manifold threats to their faith, on the strength of Christ’s death and resurrection they can build on the effective promise of God’s grace in Word and Sacrament and so be sure of this grace. (35) This was emphasized in a particular way by the Reformers: in the midst of temptation, believers should not look to themselves but look solely to Christ and trust only him. In trust in God’s promise they are assured of their salvation, but are never secure looking at themselves. (36) Catholics can share the concern of the Reformers to ground faith in the objective reality of Christ’s promise, to look away from one’s own experience, and to trust in Christ’s forgiving word alone (cf. Mt 16:19; 18:18). With the Second Vatican Council, Catholics state: to have faith is to entrust oneself totally to God, who liberates us from the darkness of sin and death and awakens us to eternal life. In this sense, one cannot believe in God and at the same time consider the divine promise untrustworthy. No one may doubt God’s mercy and Christ’s merit. Every person, however, may be concerned about his salvation when he looks upon his own weaknesses and shortcomings. Recognizing his own failures, however, the believer may yet be certain that God intends his salvation.1

See All Chapters

Gregory Nazianzen’s reading of Habbakuk 3:2 and Its Reception: A Lesson from Byzantine Scripture Exegesis

ePub

Gregory Nazianzen’s reading of Habbakuk 3:2 and Its Reception: A Lesson from Byzantine Scripture Exegesis

Bogdan G. Bucur and Elijah N. Mueller

Introduction

At least since the nineteenth century, Gregory of Nazianzus has been known in academia as one of the three “Cappadocian Fathers,” along with his friends Basil of Caesarea and Gregory of Nyssa. Much older than this scholarly label is the ecclesial designation of “three holy fathers, great hierarchs, and ecumenical teachers” under which Gregory of Nazianzus, Basil of Caesarea, and John Chrysostom (rather than Greogry of Nyssa) are commemorated jointly since the eleventh century. With its typical rhetorical flourish, Byzantine hymnography renders homage to the three hierarchs for their special contribution to Trinitarian theology, celebrating them, as the apolytikion of the feast says, as “the three greatest luminaries of the three-sun divinity.”

The hagiographic memory of the church honors Gregory not so much as bishop of Nazianzus, but as “Gregory the Theologian”—a title of distinction shared only with the author of the fourth Gospel and, ironically, with Symeon the New Theologian.1 Indeed, Gregory seems to have been viewed as the theologian par excellence. His orations, the most copied of all Byzantine manuscripts after the Scriptures, recited on Sundays and feast days over the course of the liturgical year, used in classroom exercises, annotated and commented upon by some of the best theological minds in Byzantium, were “cited, plagiarized, and plundered thousands of times,” and, before being translated into all languages of the Christian commonwealth, came to constitute a common cultural pool of formulations used in the Greek-speaking East in the same way that phrases and bons mots from La Fontaine are used in French, or Shakespearean turns of phrase are still with us in English.2

See All Chapters




Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000044083
Isbn
9781442229235
File size
3.96 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata