Medium 9781442229099

Pro Ecclesia Vol 16-N3: A Journal of Catholic and Evangelical Theology

Views: 994
Ratings: (0)
Pro Ecclesia is a quarterly journal of theology published by the Center for Catholic and Evangelical Theology. It seeks to give contemporary expression to the one apostolic faith and its classic traditions, working for and manifesting the church's unity by research, theological construction, and free exchange of opinion. Members of its advisory council represent communities committed to the authority of Holy Scripture, ecumenical dogmatic teaching and the structural continuity of the church, and are themselves dedicated to maintaining and invigorating these commitments. The journal publishes biblical, liturgical, historical and doctrinal articles that promote or illumine its purposes.

Ways to subscribe:
Call toll-free: 800-273-2223
Email: journals@rowman.com

For back-issues, please contact journals@rowman.com

Editorial inquiries:
Joseph Mangina, joseph.mangina@utoronto.ca
Submissions should be sent by email attachment in Microsoft Word, double-spaced, with identifying marks removed for the purposes of blind peer review.

Book review inquiries:
Chad Pecknold, pecknold@cua.edu

Advertising inquiries:
Charles Roth, Jr., charlie@spireads.com

Subscription inquiries:
journals@rowman.com
ISSN: 1063-8512

List price: $19.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Articles

Format Buy Remix

HOW CAN ONE BE AND SERVE AS A BISHOP?

ePub

Eero Huovinen

In today's world, leadership is assessed in a more overt and critical manner than it has been previously. The democratization of societies and the reinforcement of the role of the media have together placed before the leaders of all institutions greater challenges than ever. Any position of power can now be called into question. Leaders cannot or may not appeal solely to their own formal authority or position. All leaders must continuously be ready to justify their own mission, goals, and roles.

Church leaders have not been spared in this development, and they will not avoid critical assessment. Critique and questions arise both from within and without the church. Church members are no longer merely obedient subjects but mature men and women, full members who take their faith seriously and are committed to their church. The spiritual nature of the episcopal office does not guarantee the bishop the authority that was self-evident even a few decades ago.

See All Chapters

THE DEVELOPMENT OF DOCTRINE: A LUTHERAN EXAMINATION

ePub

H. Ashley Hall

The "development of doctrine" is a thorny issue in Christian theology. Despite a few historical precursors (such as the Fifth Theological Oration of Gregory Nazianzen and the sixteenth-century polemics of Albert Pigghe), it is a relatively modern construct. The idea received its first conscientious investigation from John Henry Cardinal Newman in the nineteenth century and was only generally accepted by the Roman Catholic Church in the twentieth century. Protestants remain divided over the subject. Most Protestants are leery of the idea because it is used by Roman Catholics to justify certain doctrines and traditions that do not have an explicit biblical warrant. More liberal Protestants have embraced the idea of the development of doctrine, though the idea is applied in a radically different way than first proposed by Cardinal Newman or as understood in the Roman Catholic Church. For these Protestants no doctrine or creed is eternally binding, so each age is free (or burdened with) formulating its faith in an exclusively contemporary context. Still, there are a large number of non-Roman Catholic Christians who accept the normative role of the Scripture and the creeds but who have not articulated the structural principles that undergird such an affirmation.

See All Chapters

A HERMENEUTICS OF PROVIDENCE AMID AFFLICTION: CONTRIBUTIONS BY LUTHER AND WEIL TO A CRUCIFORM DOCTRINE OF PROVIDENCE

ePub

Amy Carr

Some years ago I spoke with staff members at Chicago's Kovler Center for the Treatment of Survivors of Torture and learned that many Christian torture survivors wonder if their torture was the will of God—just as many Buddhists believe they were tortured because of past karma. Such a sense of providence is common in grassroots theological reflection, if not in academic theology—a sense of divine purpose expressed in the first-person voice: God somehow led me into affliction, perhaps to force me to learn something, perhaps for inscrutable reasons.1 This view of providence haunts Scripture, too, as in Lam 3:1-3: "I am the [one] who has seen affliction by the rod of [God's] wrath. [God] has driven me away and made me walk in darkness rather than light; indeed, [God] has turned a hand against me again and again, all day long."2

How might we account theologically for such testimony about providence amid affliction or trauma—amid forms of suffering severe enough to disrupt a capacity to trust God and others? Do we take this form of religious experience at face value—imitating Job's friends, who perceive Job's suffering as divine punishment for sin? Or do we dismiss troubling senses of God in affliction as simply false, unmask them as distorted readings of providence? The first option blames traumatized people themselves for the disruptive effects of affliction; they suffer because they sinned. It also depicts a punitive God many find unpalatable or untenable, especially with respect to undeserved suffering. By contrast, the second option assumes that God never acts providentially through affliction per se; this view accords with prophetic efforts to name and address the human causes of trauma such as torture, war, sexual abuse, rape, and domestic violence. Marie F. Fortune, founder of the Center for the Prevention of Sexual and Domestic Violence (now the FaithTrust Institute), speaks for many when she insists this is the only appropriate option:

See All Chapters

HAMANN BEFORE KIERKEGAARD: A SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGICAL OVERSIGHT

ePub

John R. Betz

The inscription on a tile stove in Kold's Tavern in Fredensborg applies to Hamann: allicit atque terret.

—Kierkegaard

To judge from his works and journals, Kierkegaard admired no modern author as much as Johann Georg Hamann (1730-1788). In a journal entry from around 1837, he writes, "Hamann and personal life on the whole in its immediate origin from the depths of character are the hyperbole of all life."1 In another entry he calls him "the greatest humorist in Christendom," which is to say, "the greatest humorist in the world."2 In 1843 and 1844, he quotes him in the epigraphs, respectively to Fear and Trembling and The Concept of Anxiety. In drafts of the latter work, he says, "[M]y soul clings to Socrates, its first love, and rejoices in the one who understood him, Hamann; for he has said the best that has been said about Socrates," adding that Hamann and Socrates are "two of the perhaps most brilliant minds of all time."3 And in the Philosophical Fragments, which also dates from this period, he praises him as one "who held firmly to the paradox."4 In view of such extraordinary statements, one would think that modern Kierkegaard scholarship would have shown more than a passing interest in Hamann. With relatively few exceptions, however, it has not, so that Kierkegaard's lament about Hamann's fate in the Concluding Unscientific Postscript applies, ironically, as much to modern Kierkegaard scholarship as it did to the Hegelian historian Michelet:5

See All Chapters

IS THE REFORMATION OVER? AND WHAT IF IT IS?

ePub

Michael Root

Mark Noll and Carolyn Nystrom

Is the Reformation Over? An Evangelical Assessment of Contemporary Roman Catholicism (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2005), 272 pp.

Reviewed by Michael Root, Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary, Columbia, SC

When two books appear within a few years with the same question in their title, then something is afoot. In 2000, Geoffrey Wainwright's Pere Marquette lecture appeared: Is the Reformation Over? Catholics and Protestants at the Turn of the Millennium. In the wake of the Catholic-Lutheran Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification, Wainwright surveyed the results of the various Catholic-Protestant dialogues that have flourished since the Second Vatican Council. To the question whether the disputes between Catholics and Protestants are settled, he answers: "more than they were."1

Mark Noll and Carolyn Nystrom's Is the Reformation Over? An Evangelical Assessment of Contemporary Roman Catholicism takes as its occasion not just the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification but, far more, the range of convergences and contacts between Roman Catholics and Evangelicals that have occurred over the last few decades. In light of these convergences, should one now ask whether the Reformation has served its purpose and should graciously go out of business?

See All Chapters




Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
I000000044112
Isbn
9781442229099
File size
356 KB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata