List price: $47.00

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (6/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Academic Optimism, Enabling Structures, and Student Achievement

ePub

Karen Anderson

Frances Kochan

Lisa A. W. Kensler

Ellen H. Reames

Academic Optimism, Enabling Structures, and Student Achievement

Delving into Relationships

ABSTRACT: This study examined the relationships between enabling structures, academic optimism, and student achievement to determine whether academic optimism served as a mediator between the two. Student achievement was measured using both criterion-referenced and norm-referenced tests. Findings indicated a relationship between academic optimism, enabling structures, and student achievement. Also, academic optimism appeared to serve as a mediator between enabling structures and norm-referenced assessments but did not correlate with criterion-referenced tests. This study is one of only a few seeking to establish connections among enabling structures, academic optimism, and student achievement, measured at the school level, in elementary schools. The use of mediation also offers a unique perspective on the literature.

See All Chapters

The Evaluation Process, Administrator Feedback, and Teacher Self-Efficacy

ePub

Rebeca Mireles-Rios

John A. Becchio

The Evaluation Process, Administrator Feedback, and Teacher Self-Efficacy

ABSTRACT: The teacher evaluation process provides opportunity for instructional feedback and teacher improvement, but also may influence the beliefs teachers have about the quality of their own work and their confidence levels as a teacher. Self-efficacy plays a vital role in determining teacher effectiveness and the students’ academic experience, but little is known about the impact the teacher evaluation process has on teacher self-efficacy. Interview data from 28 high school teachers indicated that the pre-observation meeting has potential to significantly benefit teachers. In addition, feedback from administrators that included both strengths and weaknesses during the post-observation phase seemed to have the most influence on teachers’ self-confidence. Implications of this study’s findings were provided and may be useful for administrators to conduct teacher evaluations in a manner that serves to enhance teacher self-efficacy.

See All Chapters

Journey of a Culturally Responsive, Socially Just Leader

ePub

Sarah N. Newcomer

Kathleen M. Cowin

Journey of a Culturally Responsive, Socially Just Leader

ABSTRACT: Principals’ beliefs and actions have powerful outcomes in the lives of the students and families they serve. In this article, we offer the portrait of a long-standing principal of a diverse urban school where the student body is 90% Latinx, 65% English learners (ELs), and 87% eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. We explore many key practices cultivated during his tenure, including creating a bilingual campus, enacting expeditionary-style learning, and building a strong sense of community. We invite readers to consider important challenges and possibilities along their own journeys toward becoming more culturally responsive, socially just leaders.

KEY WORDS: Culturally Responsive Leadership, Social Justice Leadership, Portraiture, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Schools, Community Engagement

Introduction

Principals are faced with a multitude of challenges in today’s schools. These demands include: an ongoing achievement gap, more aptly described as an opportunity gap, for ethnically, culturally, and linguistically diverse students (Au, 2011; DeShano da Silva, Huguley, Kakli, & Rao, 2007), inequitable funding (Darling-Hammond, 2004; Kozol, 1991), increasingly segregated schools (Gándara & Contreras, 2009; Orfield & Frankenberg, 2014), high-stakes accountability measures (Booher-Jennings, 2005; Mintrop, 2012), increased rate of students living in poverty (U.S. Census Bureau, 2016), and a shortage of teachers prepared to work with today’s diverse students (Frankenberg & Siegel-Hawley, 2008; Nieto, 2010). However, principals are also uniquely positioned to address these inequities. Cambron-McCabe and McCarthy (2005) note that school leaders face “one of the most important opportunities to influence social justice” (p. 208). How can aspiring and practicing principals rise to this opportunity?

See All Chapters

Why Principals Sidestep Instructional Leadership

ePub

Haim Shaked

Why Principals Sidestep Instructional Leadership

The Disregarded Question of Schools’ Primary Objective

ABSTRACT: Principal educators’ and policy makers’ predominant expectation from school principals to serve as instructional leaders—who engage primarily in a wide range of activities that clearly focus on improving teaching and learning for all students—has scarcely been applied in practice by principals in today’s schools. Researchers have found several reasons for this gap between professional recommendations and actual principal behavior. The current qualitative study, based on semi-structured interviews with 41 Israeli principals, suggests one more explanation for today’s reality of principals’ limited engagement in instructional leadership: Some principals uphold a non-academic definition of schools’ major goal—focusing on students’ well-being, social skills, values, etc.—and thereby claim that improvements in teaching and learning should not be at the top of the school administrators’ priorities. This goal as a possible mechanism underlying principals’ noncompliance has not been investigated to date.

See All Chapters

Perceptions of Elementary Principals on Compass Evaluation System

ePub

Eboni Brown

Krishna Bista

Perceptions of Elementary Principals on Compass Evaluation System

A Case of Louisiana Schools

ABSTRACT: This study explores the perceptions of elementary school principals on the Compass teacher evaluation system in a Southern Louisiana school district in the United States. There were seven themes that emerged from the qualitative data analysis: compliance, subjectivity, accountability, expectation, confinement, inconsistency, and helpfulness. Data analysis led to the following major findings: (a) all principals comply with the functions of Compass; (b) principals experience subjectivity when using the Compass teacher evaluation system; (c) principals believe that Compass holds teachers accountable for their performances; (d) principals would like Compass to be consistent, unambiguous, and not place limitations on teacher practices; and (e) principals experience a lack of involvement and support from the central office.

KEY WORDS: Elementary Principals, Compass, Teacher Evaluation, Accountability, Professional Development, Central Office

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
BPE0000277012
Isbn
9781475845914
File size
1.17 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata