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JSL Vol 28-N2

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Coaching Principals for the Complexity of School Reform

ePub

Chad R. Lochmiller

Coaching Principals for the Complexity of School Reform

ABSTRACT: This multi-case qualitative study describes how leadership coaches working in a university-based coaching program provided support to school principals in three urban elementary schools in the western United States. Drawing on qualitative data collected during a single school year, the study examines which issues leadership coaches prioritized and how they provided coaching support. A thematic analysis of the data produced four findings. These findings suggest that coaches focused their work on classroom instruction and adopted differentiated responses to support based on principal and school needs. The article concludes by discussing the implications for leadership preparation and school reform.

KEY WORDS: Leadership Coaching, Instructional Leadership, School Principals, Professional Development, School Reform

Urban school leaders face tremendous pressure to improve student achievement outcomes. Scholars have suggested leadership coaching as one of many strategies that may be helpful in supporting school leaders who engage in significant school reform efforts (Barnett & O’Mahony, 2008; Neufeld & Roper, 2003; O’Mahony & Barnett, 2008; O’Mahony, Matthews, & Barnett, 2009; Wise & Jacobo, 2010). Leadership coaching is distinct from instructional coaching, which is often used to support classroom teachers in acquiring more desirable pedagogical practices (Gallucci, Van Lare, Yoon, & Boatright, 2010) or creating coherence across instructional reforms (Woulfin & Rigby, 2017). In recent years, leadership coaching research has expanded, with empirical evidence demonstrating both the efficacy of leadership coaching approaches (Goff, Guthrie, Goldring, & Bickman, 2014; Grissom & Harrington, 2010) and providing descriptions of various leadership coaching approaches, models, and programs (Lochmiller, 2014; Silver, Lochmiller, Copland, & Tripps, 2009; Villani, 2005). A few scholars have spent considerable time investigating how leadership coaching might be effectively provided over a period of one to three years as part of an induction program designed for novice principals or as a form professional development designed for novice, mid-career, or veteran administrators (Lochmiller, 2014; O’Mahony & Barnett, 2008; Silver et al., 2009; Villani, 2005). Findings from these studies suggest that leadership coaching is not a static practice, but frequently evolves in response to the individual principal’s needs and school-based conditions (Lochmiller & Silver, 2010). As such, the evolutionary nature of leadership coaching support makes it ideal for leaders entering the unstable contexts of struggling urban schools. Indeed, leadership coaching may well enable principals to manage the internal and external factors influencing schools that initiate school-wide reform (Knapp, 1997; Marks & Nance, 2007).

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Teacher Collaborative Action Research

ePub

Katherine A. Curry

Jackie Mania-Singer

Ed Harris

Shawna Richardson

Teacher Collaborative Action Research

The Complexity of Professional Development in Rural and Alternative School Environments

ABSTRACT: This qualitative case study utilized distributed leadership theory and Capobianco and Feldman’s (2006) conceptualization of conditions for collaborative action research (CAR) to describe the implementation of CAR as professional development (PD) and school improvement strategy in two educational contexts, one alternative school and one rural, in a Midwestern state. Findings indicate that distributed leadership facilitates CAR as a powerful PD tool and results in development of action plans for school improvement; however, conditions are necessary for CAR to effect professional practice.

KEY WORDS: Action Research, Professional Development, Distributed Leadership, Rural Schools, Alternative Schools

Research is replete with evidence that continuing, practical PD is vital to school success (Darling-Hammond, Wei, Andree, Richardson, & Orphanos, 2009; Yoon, Duncan, Wen-Yu Lee, & Shapley, 2007; Zichner & Noffke, 2001). However, current financial situations and other barriers in states across the United States may limit the ability of districts to provide PD as effectively as they have in the past (Leachman, Albares, Masterson, & Wallace, 2016).

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Aerobic Physical Activity and the Leadership of Principals

ePub

Kari Kiser

Jennifer Clayton

Aerobic Physical Activity and the Leadership of Principals

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to explore if there was a connection between regular aerobic physical activity and the stress and energy levels of principals as they reported it. The current aerobic physical activity level of principals was discovered. Energy and stress levels of principals who engage in aerobic physical activity, and those who do not, were determined. A survey administered via e-mail was distributed to a national sample of those in Center for Educational Improvement (CEI). The data were analyzed using frequencies and percentages, as well as chi square and t-tests. Findings revealed the majority of principals (65.7%, n = 73) did not engage in the recommended amount of aerobic physical activity and most principals (56.7%, n = 63) engage two days or less per week.

KEY WORDS: Aerobic Physical Activity, Principal Leadership, Stress, Energy

INTRODUCTION

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Context for Content Teachers’ Learning

ePub

Felice Atesoglu Russell

Context for Content Teachers’ Learning

Leadership and Supports in a Linguistically Diverse High School

ABSTRACT: This article examines the context for content teachers’ professional learning concerning English learners (ELs), paying particular attention to the role of leadership in supporting and constraining this capacity development. The contextual features of the school are analyzed, specifically the leadership of the principal and an EL facilitator, as well as supports that influenced the development of teacher capacity. The data used in this analysis comes from a yearlong qualitative case study of professional learning and the instruction of ELs in one diverse, urban high school. Data analysis revealed two main themes (1) the significance of the role and vision of the principal and (2) the relevance of cultural norms, structures, and activities that contributed to content teachers’ capacity to meet the needs of ELs. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

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Home as the Least Restrictive Environment for Students with Medical Disabilities

ePub

Benjamin C. Lustig

Home as the Least Restrictive Environment for Students with Medical Disabilities

Recommendations for School Leaders Under the IDEA

ABSTRACT: School leaders have a prominent role on Individual Education Program (IEP) teams and often face very challenging obstacles when determining substantive educational services and placement in the least restrictive environment (LRE) for students with medical disabilities. In absence of federal statutory and regulatory policy, standard legal research methodology was used to determine whether explicit and implicit recommendations existed for school leaders elsewhere in the law for the use of homebound placements for students with medical disabilities under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Homebound instructional services can be an LRE because educational services are provided to students who would be unable to attend school programs and activities.

KEY WORDS: Special Education Administration, Homebound Instruction, Law, Placement

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Spatial Sense Makes Math Sense

ePub

Spatial Sense Makes Math Sense

How Parents Can Help Their Children Learn Both

By Catheryne Draper

December 2017 • 170 pages

978-1-4758-3428-4 • $70.00 Cloth

978-1-4758-3429-1 • $35.00 Paper

978-1-4758-3430-7 • $33.00 eBook

Spatial Sense Makes Math Sense: How Parents Can Help Their Children Learn Both brings the strengths of both algebra (arithmetic) and geometry into focus by showing how spatial relationships can make both make more sense. Parents will learn how to further develop and improve their child’s spatial sense using visual-spatial strategies of classifying, drawing diagrams, big idea concept building, visualizing, and more. As Sawyer encourages, “Even if the pictures are not good, the effort of making them will leave lasting traces in the mind and can cause the work to be remembered.” Whether you had a preference for geometry and endured algebra, loved algebra and never understood geometry, or were one of those people who never recognized a purpose for any of the math topics or, in truth, in any mathematics, this book will show parents how developing spatial sense can help visually explain both algebra and geometry relationships. You will read about Sophie Germain who believed that algebra and geometry worked hand-in-hand because, as she described them, algebra is written geometry and geometry is figured algebra.

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Instruction to Author

ePub

INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS

Submitting Papers to the Journal:

1. Manuscripts submitted for publication consideration should be sent electronically, via e-mail attachment, to Dr. Elizabeth Murakami and Dr. Natalie Tran, Editors, Journal of School Leadership, at jsl@unt.edu. Two (2) copies of the manuscript should be attached: a master copy, including a title page (see instructions below) and all citations and references, and a masked copy of the manuscript, with the title page and all other author identifying information removed (including citations and references pertaining to any of the contributing authors’ works). Attachments should be in Microsoft Word format. Authors will receive e-mail acknowledgment of receipt of their manuscript within two weeks of submission. If confirmation is not received within this period, contact the editor.

2. All manuscripts should be typed, double-spaced, and follow the style outlined in the sixth edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

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