Medium 9781475842425

IJER Vol 27-N1

Views: 529
Ratings: (0)

List price: $38.00

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

5 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Logan

ePub

A Historical and Political Look at the Modern School Choice Movement

Stephanie R. Logan

ABSTRACT: School choice in the United States can be traced back to the start of civil society when wealthy families selected a school based on educational philosophy, location, or religious tradition. As common schools emerged, larger portions of the population were able to gain access to education. However, many discovered that quality public schools were not a reality for all students. In response, some looked to school choices within and outside of the public school sector. This literature review chronicles school choice efforts to emerge following the 1954 Brown decision and highlights liberal and conservative political heritages of school choice in the United States.

Key Words: school choice, history of school choice, school choice options, school choice in the United States

A Historical and Political Look at the Modern School Choice Movement

The history of educational school choice can be traced back to the start of civil society in the United States, where families who found schooling to be important, available, and affordable were able to select educational experiences for their children (Sweetland, 2002). Most notably, private schools offered choice by competing for students and families who were able to afford the tuition. During this early period, school choice reflected the selection of a school based on its philosophy of education, its location, or its focus on a particular religious tradition (Kane & Wilson, 2006). With the emergence of the common school, locally controlled and funded schools were made available to children of European ancestry or White children. However, many Catholic immigrants championed educational opportunities that allowed for the respect of Catholic religious traditions and practices (Mondale & Patton, 2001). In response, Catholic leaders were able to create the earliest alternative to public education with a privately funded system of Catholic schools. In the centuries and decades since, school choice has been championed by both liberals and conservatives and has even been argued as a First Amendment right on the grounds of equity and justice (Kane & Wilson, 2006). Based in part on the author’s previous work (Logan, 2009), this comprehensive literature review seeks to chronicle the historical and political heritage of the school choice movement following the 1954 Brown decision.

See All Chapters

Hoppey

ePub

The Evolution of Inclusive Practice in Two Elementary Schools

Reforming Teacher Purpose, Instructional Capacity, and Data-Informed Practice

David Hoppey

William R. Black

Ann M. Mickelson

ABSTRACT: This qualitative case study focuses on the evolution of inclusive school reform in two elementary schools in a large metropolitan district. Four central themes that emerged during data analysis are highlighted: (1) Unifying a vision: Reframing special education; (2) Developing collaborative structures for inclusion; (3) Increasing confidence and capacity: The importance of data-informed practice; and (4) Negotiating district and state constraints on inclusive practice. This article concludes with a discussion of the study’s implications for inclusive school reform as well as directions for future research.

KeyWords: inclusion, school reform, data-informed decision making, teacher leadership, district special education policy.

Introduction

Over the past decade, federal mandates induced schools to provide all students access to the general education curriculum (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2004) and required improved student outcomes for all students (No Child Left Behind, 2001). These mandates have resulted in increased number of students with disabilities being served in general education classrooms (McLeskey, Landers, Williamson, & Hoppey, 2012). Concurrently, many educational leaders and researchers have advocated for schools and districts to reform school norms, structures, and processes in order to both include students with disabilities in general education classrooms and improve outcomes for all students (Kleinhammer-Tramill, Burrello, & Sailor, 2013; Kozleski, Artiles, & Lacy, 2013).

See All Chapters

Sahin

ePub

Charter School Achievements in Texas

Public Versus Charter Schools

Alpaslan Sahin

Victor Willson

Robert M. Capraro

Abstract: This study aimed to investigate the performance of a charter school network, Harmony Public Schools (HPS), in a 3-year longitudinal student-level research study of high school mathematics, reading, and science performance using 2009–2011 Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skill student data. Propensity-score-matched public (N = 19) and Harmony (N = 11) schools’ performances were compared. We conducted a two-level multivariate analysis of covariance on binary outcomes (pass–no pass) for grades 9–11. HPS performed significantly better at grade 9 and worse at grade 11, with no statistical differences at grade 10 in mathematics. Type of school was not significant at either grade 9 or 10 for reading. For science performances, Harmony charter schools performed better at 10th grade and significantly better at 11th grade. Implications of the findings were discussed as to whether charter schools keep their promises of providing quality education.

See All Chapters

Hooker

ePub

Lesbian and Gay Educators Functioning in Heteronormative Schools

Steven D. Hooker

Abstract: This qualitative study explores the ways in which lesbian and gay educators negotiate their sexual identities in their school settings. Ten gay and lesbian public and Catholic school educators from rural, suburban, and urban schools were interviewed. Each of these educators negotiated their sexual identities differently within their school communities; however, descriptors such as age, experience level, and school setting did not affect their identity negotiation. Most of these educators were unable to integrate their sexual identity with their teacher identity due to various types of fear: fear of being fired, fear of entering the teaching profession, fear of being outed and facing harassment and isolation, and fear of undermining authenticity.

KeyWords: lesbian and gay educators, sexual identity, heteronormative schools, school policy

Are lesbian and gay educators free to openly negotiate their sexual identities and be authentic in their school settings? This article examines how lesbian and gay educators responded to that question. These narratives are used in an attempt to unpack the ways in which these educators are able to merge their sexual identities with their teacher identities in their school settings, and how it affects their lives in their schools, a challenge with which heterosexual educators seldom struggle (DePalma & Atkinson, 2009). Anyone who goes to work daily and tries to hide who they are, as a person, is unable to function at full capacity.

See All Chapters

Mediavilla

ePub

Is There Real Freedom of School Choice?

An Analysis from a Study in Chile1

Mauro Mediavilla

Adrián Zancajo

Abstract: Between 1981 and 1990, Chile began to implement an education reform based on school choice and a financing system through vouchers. In theory, the system ensures complete freedom of choice of school by families. This article attempts to identify the existence of factors that conditioned the enrollment process in different types of schools existing nowadays in the Chilean educational system, the largest quasi-market of Latin America. Results show a social stratification and separation by schools and indicate how geographical distance and social composition are the most critical factors for families when choosing a school.

KeyWords: (JEL Codes: I21, I28), school choice, social class, quasi-markets, voucher, chile

Introduction

Between 1981 and 1990, during the military dictatorship, Chile implemented an ambitious education reform based on school choice and a financing system through vouchers (Delannoy, 2000). This reform of the educational system and subsequent reforms were aimed at improving the quality of education through the interaction between free choice for families and competition between schools for students. Parallel to this process, there was a significant increase in the presence of the private sector in education, especially subsidized private schools (Joiko, 2012).

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
BPE0000258027
Isbn
9781475842425
File size
1.25 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata