Medium 9781475836769

JSL Vol 27-N6

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6 Articles

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Wilkerson

ePub

Reginald D. Wilkerson

Camille M. Wilson

“Beating against the Wind”

The Politics of Race and Retention in Supporting African American Principal Advocacy and Growth

ABSTRACT: In this article, authors offer a CRT-driven analysis of in-depth interview data from two African American principals charged with turning around poverty-impacted, largely African–American populated schools. Both served as social justice–oriented leaders who countered traditional administrative approaches and disrupted racially and/or socioeconomically biased practices. Their leadership and student advocacy methods clashed with district ideals and policies, and each faced severe repercussions. The authors highlight why supporting and retaining such school leaders is necessary, and offer strategies capable of helping the educational community move forward in supporting a vulnerable leadership population commonly assigned to improve the most challenging U.S. schools.

KEY WORDS: Critical Race Theory, Principal Support, Administrative Retention, Advocacy

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Webner

ePub

Steven Webner

David De Jong

Ayana Campoli

Mark Baron

Public School Board Presidents’ and Superintendents’ Perceptions of the Characteristics of Effective Superintendents in a Midwestern State

ABSTRACT: The expectation for strong superintendent leadership has increased due to a demand for greater student achievement and accountability. This study examined public school board presidents’ and superintendents’ perceptions of the characteristics superintendents must possess to effectively lead in today’s complex educational system.

A researcher-developed survey instrument was used to collect data from public school board presidents and superintendents in a Midwestern state. Computation of item means indicated school board presidents perceived developing a close, positive, and productive relationship with the school board, developing a culture and climate which enhances teacher morale and student achievement, developing partnerships between school and community, developing budgets and manage fiscal matters, and visibility throughout the community and district as the most important characteristics of effective superintendents. Superintendents perceived developing a culture and climate which enhances teacher morale and student achievement, developing a close positive, and productive relationship with the school board, building a team atmosphere and coherence, developing budgets and manage fiscal matters, and communicating with stakeholders as the most important characteristics of effective superintendents. School board presidents considered involvement of stakeholders in collaborative goal-setting and monitoring as well as superintendent visibility throughout the community and district to be significantly more important than did superintendents. In contrast, superintendents believed recruiting, selecting, developing personnel, and implementing effective evaluation structures to be significantly more important than did the superintendents.

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Leis

ePub

Micela Leis

Sara E. Rimm-Kaufman

Carol L. C. Paxton

Lia E. Sandilos

Leading Together

Strengthening Relational Trust in the Adult School Community

ABSTRACT: Research from the past two decades positions relational trust as a key factor in school reform efforts. Trust between teachers and their principal (teacher-principal trust) and teachers and their colleagues (teacher-teacher trust) are particularly important. Leading Together (LT) is a new professional development and coaching model of the Center for Courage & Renewal designed to develop individual and collective capacity to build trust and enhance communication among adults in schools. In this article, we investigate the relation between successful implementation of LT and changes in trust in eight schools that participated in a pilot study of LT from 2012 to 2014. Results showed moderate increases in teacher-principal trust and teacher-teacher trust in schools implementing LT successfully. This article describes changes in trust and processes needed for the successful implementation of team-implemented programs, models, or approaches.

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Haecker

ePub

Bonnie M. Haecker

Forrest C. Lane

Linda R. Zientek

Evidence-Based Decision-Making

Influences on Central Office Administrators’ Decision-Making Practices

ABSTRACT: Research has explored the use of evidence-based practices within schools but less is known about evidence-based decision-making among school district central office administrators. This study explored how individual and school-level characteristics of administrators were related to the implementation of evidence-based practices. Findings suggested that administrators were more knowledgeable about evidence-based practices if they were working in districts with existing policies in place to address the use of research in decision-making. Administrators were less knowledgeable about evidence-based practices in small, rural districts.

KEY WORDS: Evidence-based Decision-Making, School District, Central Office Administrators

Evidence-based decision-making has been a widespread movement in the medical field since the early 1960s (Hammersley, 2004). Yet, in education the push for evidence-based practice did not really begin until the enactment of several laws mandating that programs and interventions purchased with federal funds provide better evidence of program effectiveness through rigorous, scientifically-based research (e.g., Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, 2004; No Child Left Behind [NCLB], 2002; Every Student Succeeds Act [ESSA], 2015). This push has placed an increased responsibility on school central office administrators to both identify high-quality research and support the decisions made using this evidence.

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Sullivan

ePub

William J. Sullivan

Charles S. Hausman

Kentucky High Schools With SROs and Without

An Examination of Criminal Violation Rates

ABSTRACT: School violence has become a focal point, sparked by violent mass killings throughout the nation. One of the most substantial efforts for improving school safety and security is the utilization of specially trained police, titled school resource officers (SROs). Regardless of the importance of maintaining safe schools and an environment that is conducive to learning, relatively little research has been conducted examining the effectiveness of these programs and the variables that may influence those findings (Raymond, 2010). This research uses two studies focused on the association of SROs and reported criminal violation rates at Kentucky high schools. Findings indicate no statistically significant differences in reported criminal violation rates between high school populations without SROs and those with full-time SROs. Implications of these findings are discussed in addition to how SRO presence may affect the frequency and accuracy of reported criminal violations.

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Instruction to AU

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