Medium 9781475837551

JEBPS Vol 16-N1

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The Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools is a leader in publishing research-to-practice articles for educators and school psychologists. The mission of this journal is to positively influence the daily practice of school psychologists and educators through studies demonstrating successful research-based practices in educational settings. As a result, the editors are committed to publishing articles with an eye toward improving student performance and outcomes by advancing psychological and educational practices in the schools. They seek articles using non-technical language that (1) outline an evidence-based practice, (2) describe the literature supporting the effectiveness and theoretical underpinnings of the practice, (3) describe the findings of a study in which the practice was implemented in an educational setting, and (4) provide readers with information they need to implement the practice in their own schools in a section entitled Implementation Guidelines.

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5 Articles

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Management of Behavioral Dynamics in General Education Classrooms

ePub

Management of Behavioral Dynamics in General Education Classrooms

Thomas W. Farmer1

David Lee2

Debbie Sprott Brooks2

Chin-Chih Chen3

Meredith Moates3

Jill V. Hamm4

ABSTRACT: Behavioral dynamics is an ongoing system of interaction that occurs among groups or networks of individuals such that the actions of each person contribute to the actions of others. Within classroom settings, student and teacher behaviors interact as part of a dynamic stream of events that evoke and maintain both appropriate and inappropriate behavior via principles of behavior. Effective classroom-based interventions require teachers to understand behavioral dynamics as they occur in classrooms and explain those dynamics using relevant behavior principles. These explanations set the stage for effective intervention. This article first provides a rationale for understanding of behavioral dynamics as they relate to behavior principles followed by a description of common behavior principles that are in play in classroom settings. Examples of how behavior principles can be used to establish novel behaviors and maintain routine behaviors are discussed.

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Mnemonic Strategies: Improving Letter–Sound Correspondence for Students with Dyslexia Enrolled in an EFL Program in Belgium

ePub

Mnemonic Strategies: Improving Letter–Sound Correspondence for Students with Dyslexia Enrolled in an EFL Program in Belgium

Ulviye Şener Akın

Phillip J. Belfiore

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of integrated, or imbedded, mnemonics on consonant letter naming and consonant sound production for four, third-grade Belgian students with dyslexia, and at-risk for academic failure in an urban English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) classroom. Mnemonic picture flashcards were designed, where the target consonant letter was imbedded as an integral part of the picture (e.g., letter D as dinosaur, letter F as flower), with assistive computer technology. In addition, corrective feedback was provided during intervention sessions. Results showed that (1) all four students reached 100% mastery on consonant letter naming and (2) two of four students reached 100% mastery for consonant sound production. Letter–sound correspondence performance maintained two weeks post-intervention. Generalization data showed, once consonant letter–sound correspondence was mastered, all students produced novel words that began and ended with consonant letter and sound. Social validity data were collected from students, teachers, and parents to document the intervention effectiveness and socially important outcomes.

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Impact of Increasing Levels of Accommodation on Students with Writing Difficulties

ePub

Impact of Increasing Levels of Accommodation on Students with Writing Difficulties

Ara J. Schmitt

Jamie L. Yarbrough

Elizabeth McCallum

Rachel Hoffman

Charles Jaquette

Katherine Piselli

ABSTRACT: Many educators rely on assistive technology to provide accommodations for students with learning disabilities (Flanagan, Bouck, & Richardson, 2013), yet a paucity of research exists in examining the effects of assistive technology on writing. This study investigated the effects of increasing levels of accommodation that included the application of assistive technology. Brief experimental analysis using an adapted alternating-treatments design was employed to compare the effects of handwriting responses (no accommodation control condition), typing responses, extended time after typing responses, and extended time after typing responses, and listening-while-reading to one’s own responses using text-to-speech assistive technology. Findings revealed that performance did not systematically increase with intensity of accommodation and treatment effects that varied by student and condition. Greatest total words written performance was obtained within the typing with extended time to edit condition. Further, it was discovered that listening-while-reading to one’s responses using assistive technology may actually hinder performance. Discussion includes an overview of practical implications of the findings and directions for future inquiry.

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Evaluating a Computer Flashcard Reading Intervention with Self-Determined Response Intervals in a Post-Secondary Student with Intellectual Disability

ePub

Evaluating a Computer-Based Flashcard Reading Intervention with Self-Determined Response Intervals in a Post-Secondary Student with Intellectual Disability

Samantha Cazzell

Kala Taylor

Christopher Skinner

Merilee McCurdy,

Amy Skinner

Dennis Ciancio

Tom Beeson

David Cihak

ABSTRACT: A multiple-baseline across-tasks design was used to evaluate the effects of a modified computer-based flashcard intervention on sight-word reading in a post-secondary education student with disability. A fixed response interval strategy was modified so that the student self-determined each response interval. The student quickly learned to control response intervals and results provide convincing evidence that the procedure enhanced sight-word acquisition. Although assessments conducted 48 days after the final treatment showed the student maintained less than half of words acquired, a brief three-session re-learning phase allowed the student to re-learn over 90% of these words. Discussion focuses on future research, including investigating possible benefits associated with allowing students with intellectual disability to self-determine response intervals.

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Using Performance Feedback to Increase Teachers’ Use of Behavior-Specific Praise: A Review of the Single-Case Literature

ePub

Using Performance Feedback to Increase Teachers’ Use of Behavior-Specific Praise: A Revi ew of the Single-Case Literature

Benjamin Riden

ABSTRACT: The primary purpose of this literature review is to summarize findings of performance feedback to increase teachers’ use of behavior specific praise (BSP) for students with disabilities in inclusive academic settings. Ten studies were identified in the literature examining performance feedback as a strategy for increasing inclusive teachers’ use of BSP. Studies were conducted in Pre-K through twelfth grade inclusive academic settings that include students at-risk or with disabilities. Findings suggest verbal, visual, and textual performance feedback have positive impacts on teachers’ use of BSP in inclusive settings for students with disabilities. Implications for future research and practice are presented.

THE PROBLEM

Many teachers are not adequately prepared to manage academic and social behavior issues in classrooms (Begeny & Martens, 2006), causing a large number to leave the profession early in their careers (Billingsley, Crockett, & Kamman, 2014; Reinke, Herman, Stormont, Newcomer, & David, 2013). A recent study conducted by the U.S. Department of Education examined public school teacher attrition of new teachers over five years beginning in 2007 showing 10% in 2008, 12% in 2009, 15% in 2010, and 17% in 2011 quit teaching or continued working in education but not as a K-12 teacher (Gray & Taie, 2015). Most notably 25% of special educators (n = 115) and 48% of general educators (n = 2,387) identify discipline problems and student motivation as pressing problems in the classroom (Billingsley, Pyecha, Smith-Davis, Murray, & Hendricks, 1995).

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