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JSL Vol 27-N2

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JSL invites the submission of manuscripts that contribute to the exchange of ideas and scholarship about schools and leadership. All theoretical and methological approaches are welcome. We do not advocate or practice a bias toward any mode of inquiry (e.g., qualitative vs. quantitative; empirical vs. conceptual; discipline-based vs. interdisciplinary) and instead operate from the assumption that all careful and methodologically sound research has the potential to contribute to our understanding of school leadership. We strongly encourage authors to consider both the local and global implications of their work. The journal’s goal is to clearly communicate with a diverse audience including both school-based and university-based educators. The journal embraces a board conception of school leadership and welcomes manuscripts that reflect the diversity of ways in which this term is understood. The journal is interested not only in manuscripts that focus on administrative leadership in schools and school districts, but also in manuscripts that inquire about teacher, student, parent, and community leadership.

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5 Articles

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Developing An Assessment of Community Equity Literacy: An Exploratory Study of Aspiring School Principals

ePub

TERRANCE L. GREEN

MELISSA A. RODGERS

Developing An Assessment of Community Equity Literacy

An Exploratory Study of Aspiring School Principals

ABSTRACT: Principals play a critical role in school-community engagement, yet there are a dearth of instruments to measure principals’ knowledge and practice in this area. This study therefore describes the research base of community equity literacy and explains why it is essential to the work of school principals and their leadership teams. It also examines the results of a pilot survey of an experienced group of aspiring school principals as a way to further develop an instrument to assess educational leaders’ community equity literacy. This article concludes with implications for leader preparation and future research.

KEY WORDS: Community Equity Literacy, Assessment, School-Community Relatio ns, School Leadership, Community-Based Equity Audit

Schools and communities are inextricably linked and offer an important relationship that can equitably strengthen academic and neighborhood-community conditions. Thus, the research on schools and communities, especially those located in urban neighborhoods of color, has garnered renewed attention from policymakers and scholars in recent years. In 2010, the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) launched the Promise Neighborhoods Initiative (PNI) to improve student outcomes in underserved urban and rural neighborhoods and to foster stronger partnerships between schools and local communities (Horsford & Sampson, 2014; Miller, Wills, & Scanlan, 2013). Between 2010 and 2012, the USDOE allocated $70 million to support the PNI. This policy effort is significant because it connects out-of-school inequities (e.g., community-based poverty) with those inequities that manifest inside of schools, as it is the “first federal initiative to put education at the center of comprehensive efforts to fight poverty in urban and rural areas” (US Department of Education, 2010, para. 1; see also Green & Gooden, 2014; Berliner, 2006; Miller, Brown, & Hopson, 2011; Milner, 2013; Milner, Murray, Farinde, & Delale-O’Connor, 2015; Noguera & Wells, 2011). Additionally, due to the new, yet shifting policy milieu in which school leaders find themselves and the evolving demands of the principalship, in 2015 scholars and practitioners put forth new national standards to guide educational leaders’ practices in ways that will be most productive and beneficial to all students (National Policy Board for Educational Administration, 2015).

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Principals Going Above and Beyond: Understanding Organizational Citizenship Behavior Among School Principals

ePub

LIORA NUTOV

ANIT SOMECH

Principals Going Above and Beyond

Understanding Organizational Citizenship Behavior Among School Principals

ABSTRACT: Organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) refers to all behaviors outside the formal role definition but which contribute to organizational functioning and performance. To date research has focused on teachers’ OCB in an attempt to identify the causes and consequences of such behavior for the individual and the organization. Questions that have yet to be addressed in the literature are: Do principals also engage in OCB? And if so, how do they interpret OCB, and what are its characteristics?

Since this is the first study to inquire into the phenomenon of OCB in the context of principalship, the qualitative method was chosen for the investigation. Fifteen post-elementary school principals were interviewed. Our findings identified four categories of principals’ OCB: effort invested in the school community; initiatives; supporting the local community; and other exceptional behaviors. We conclude by delineating the findings’ theoretical and practical implications and by introducing a proposed platform for new directions in OCB research.

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Sustaining Continuous Improvement Through and Professional Learning Communities in a Secondary School

ePub

CHRISTOPHER M. JONES

REBECCA A. THESSIN

Sustaining Continuous Improvement Through Professional Learning Communities in a Secondary School

ABSTRACT: This study sought to discover how one high school principal sustains a context for continued improvement through PLCs using case study methodology. Schools comprised of PLCs allow educators to grapple with the unique needs of their students in their specific contexts. The problem is that there is limited literature and research to indicate how leaders sustain PLCs over time. Therefore, the overarching research question of this study was: How do the principal, PLC leaders, and teachers in a school that has developed and implemented PLCs describe their experience of the change process to sustain the work of continuous improvement?

KEY WORDS: Continuous Improvement, Professional Learning Communities, Sustaining, Instructional Leadership

INTRODUCTION

Research has begun to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of teacher collaboration in professional learning communities (PLCs) to facilitate improvement over time and to also change the core practice of education (Burnette, 2002; Cranston, 2009; DuFour, 2004; Giles & Hargreaves, 2006; Hipp & Huffman, 2003; Lujan & Day, 2010; McTighe, 2008; Scribner, Cockrell, Cockrell, & Valentine, 1999; Wells & Feun, 2007, 2013). The purpose of this study was to closely examine the change process a school undergoes as it develops, implements, and sustains continuous improvement efforts through a structure that relies on the collaboration of leaders and teachers to be effective—PLCs. We sought to understand how one secondary school principal sustained a context for continued improvement through PLCs using case study methodology. The research question developed to guide this study was: How do the principal, PLC leaders, and teachers in a school that has developed and implemented PLCs describe their experience of the change process to sustain the work of continuous improvement?

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Fostering a College-Going Culture for Historically Underserved Students: One Principal’s Role

ePub

MELISSA A. MARTINEZ

DAPHNE EVERMAN

Fostering a College-Going Culture for Historically Underserved Students

One Principal’s Role

ABSTRACT: Current scholarship focused on a college-going culture, and college readiness in schools often underestimates or gives little attention to the role of the school leader. This study draws on qualitative data from a larger descriptive case study to help fill this gap by examining the role and approach of one principal at a public high school in Texas that has found success in graduating a large proportion of its racially and economically diverse student population college-ready. The principal’s leadership strategies and the challenges he faced are revealed through his narrative and the perspective of multiple stakeholders to more aptly understand how his role and approach contributed to the school’s college-going culture.

KEY WORDS: College-Going Culture, College Readiness, High School Principal

Today, more than ever before, elementary and secondary school teachers and leaders are charged with preparing and graduating students who are deemed college-ready; capable of enrolling and succeeding in a credit-bearing general education course at a two- or four-year degree-granting postsecondary institution without remediation (Conley, 2011). The construct of college readiness itself has emerged and evolved over the last 15 years as “an umbrella term that refers to the multidimensional set of skills, traits, habits, and knowledge that students need to enter college with the capacity to succeed once they are enrolled” (Arnold, Lu, & Armstrong, 2012, p. 2). Various models have been developed to help ascertain the particular facets that contribute to and challenges that can impede a student’s college readiness (Arnold et al., 2012; Conley, 2011), all of which recognize the complexity of this construct.

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Transformational Leadership and its Impact on School Climate and Teachers’ Self-Efficacy in Indonesian High Schools

ePub

ENCERIA DAMANIK

JILL ALDRIDGE

Transformational Leadership and its Impact on School Climate and Teachers’ Self-Efficacy in Indonesian High Schools

ABSTRACT: This study examined the relationships between principals’ leadership, school climate, and teachers’ sense of self-efficacy. Drawing on existing scales, this study examined six aspects of principal leadership (professional interaction, participatory decision-making, individual support, intellectual stimulation and moral perspective) and four school climate factors (staff collegiality, goal consensus, work pressure, resource adequacy, and staff freedom). The participants included 604 Indonesian teachers drawn from 27 high schools. The data were analysed using Structural Equation Modeling. The results indicated statistically significant and positive relationships between leadership style, school climate, and teacher self-efficacy. With the exception of individual support, the relationships between principal leadership and teacher self-efficacy were largely indirect, mediated through staff collegiality and goal consensus.

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