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IJER Vol 26-N1

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The mission of the International Journal of Educational Reform (IJER) is to keep readers up-to-date with worldwide developments in education reform by providing scholarly information and practical analysis from recognized international authorities. As the only peer-reviewed scholarly publication that combines authors’ voices without regard for the political affiliations perspectives, or research methodologies, IJER provides readers with a balanced view of all sides of the political and educational mainstream. To this end, IJER includes, but is not limited to, inquiry based and opinion pieces on developments in such areas as policy, administration, curriculum, instruction, law, and research.
IJER should thus be of interest to professional educators with decision-making roles and policymakers at all levels turn since it provides a broad-based conversation between and among policymakers, practitioners, and academicians about reform goals, objectives, and methods for success throughout the world.
Readers can call on IJER to learn from an international group of reform implementers by discovering what they can do that has actually worked. IJER can also help readers to understand the pitfalls of current reforms in order to avoid making similar mistakes. Finally, it is the mission of IJER to help readers to learn about key issues in school reform from movers and shakers who help to study and shape the power base directing educational reform in the U.S. and the world.

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5 Articles

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Shifting the Classical Paradigm: The Impact of Information Technology on Contemporary Education . . . Ilghiz M. Sinagatullin

ePub

Shifting the Classical Paradigm

The Impact of Information Technology on Contemporary Education

Ilghiz M. Sinagatullin

ABSTRACT: The article seeks to substantiate that contemporary epoch witnesses a rapid shift from the classical to information paradigm owing to an unprecedented impact of information technology on the sphere of education. The author examines the advantages and disadvantages of digital technology, focuses on the issues of Internet addiction, and concentrates on the necessity of developing school graduates’ information competence within a well-built information environment. Finally, he provides a range of recommendations that are worth taking into consideration as the super-modern information and communications technology continue gaining young people’s minds.

KEYWORDS: Globalization, Information Paradigm, Cyberspace, Information Technology, Information Competence, Cybersecurity

A Today the Internet, the basic device related to information technology, is used by almost every human being. Students, ranging from elementary to high schools and on to colleges and universities, get lost in the labyrinths of cyberspace. Educators, teacher educators, academics, and researchers spend equally huge amounts of time in front of the computer screen. Why this happens is transparently clear: the time has come! Contemporary epoch dramatically challenges the former, classical ways and means of cognizing the objective reality. The time-honored and accustomed approaches and means have not disappeared for good. They remain, only their share in cognitive processes has considerably diminished.

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Globalization and Educational Reform in Kazakhstan: English as the Language of Instruction in Graduate Programs . . . Seth A. Agbo and Natalya Pak

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Globalization and Educational Reform in Kazakhstan

English as the Language of Instruction in Graduate Programs

Seth A. Agbo

Natalya Pak

ABSTRACT: Framed by globalization, Kazakhstan has embarked on initiatives to establish standards and quality educational services for universities to catch up with those in developed countries. The government policy for educational reforms is viewed not only as a means of convergence, that is, catching up with the knowledge-based societies of Europe and North America, but also as a gateway into the EU. The recent government policy calls for trilingual competence, implying a desire to equip future generations with fluency in three languages, namely, Kazakh, Russian, and English. Through this initiative, universities are mandating the English language as the language of instruction in graduate programs. This article is a case study of language reforms in a major university in Kazakhstan. The study investigated the implications of the English as the language of instruction policy in higher education and examined the challenges posed by the policy on faculty, students, and administrators. The findings indicated that the efficacy of the current reforms is bounded by the limits of the higher education traditionalism and the long-established educational value orientations in Kazakhstan. As a result, to become competitive globally, universities must develop new attitudes and organizational structures as well as improve current practices based on developing national identity.

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Peace-based Education: Effective Pedagogical Reform . . . H. B. Danesh

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Peace-Based Education

Effective Pedagogical Reform

H. B. Danesh

ABSTRACT: This article proposes that the universally acknowledged need for education reform requires both new conceptual and methodological approaches. At the core of this reform is transformation from conflict-based to peace-based educational concepts and practices aimed at creating school environments that promote academic and relational excellence, are safe and nurturing, and are free from bullying and violence. The article draws from the research done and lessons learned from more than sixteen ongoing years of implementation of Education for Peace (EFP)—a comprehensive peace-based education program—in more than one thousand schools, involving thousands of educators, and several hundred thousand students (K-12) in the highly conflicted and traumatized war-torn country of Bosnia and Herzegovina and more recently in schools in the United States, Mexico, Bermuda, and elsewhere.

KEYWORDS: education reform, peace-based education; worldview transformation, bullying and violence prevention, conflict resolution

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Institutional Barriers to Educational Participation: Examples from China and India . . . Ashwini Tiwari and Tian Fu

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Institutional Barriers to Educational Participation

Examples from China and India

Ashwini Tiwari

Tian Fu

ABSTRACT: Drawing primarily from Pierre Bourdieu’s work on “field” and “capital,” this article examines in detail how institutional barriers have systematically denied access to quality education to lower-class/caste students, which results in educational inequality impeding the efforts of sustainable development. China’s hukou (household registration system) and India’s varna vyavastha (caste system) are used as examples to illustrate how oblivious institutional barriers could manifest and exhibit in similar ways in two distinct sociopolitical nations. The article concludes with making a case for deconstructing the discourses on education for sustainable development based on the principles of social justice and equity.

KEYWORDS: China, India, institutional barriers, educational equality

Introduction

Education for sustainable development has long been a topic of discussion on various sociopolitical platforms across the globe. In 2002 the United Nations (UN) declared 2005–2014 as a decade of education for sustainable development (DESD). By ratifying 2005–2014 as DESD each member country agreed to create a substantial base to make education accessible to its citizens (UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, 2008). Specifically, the signatory counties unanimously agreed to implement measures to provide access to quality education to all.

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An Analysis of the Education Decentralization Policy in Malawi . . . Kafumbu Fatsani Thomas

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An Analysis of the Education Decentralization Policy in Malawi

Kafumbu Fatsani Thomas

ABSTRACT: This article makes an assessment on the implementation of the decentralization policy in education in Malawi in relation to the achievement of its objectives. To bring this into perspective, the socioeconomic, legal and political contexts, and the related policies, which have a bearing on education decentralization, have been analyzed. The decentralization of education in Malawi has to a great extent been unable to meet its objectives as a result of reluctance of the central ministry to cede more decision-making power to the local level, and due to insufficient human resources. The article concludes by giving policy recommendations.

KEYWORDS: education decentralization, policy, good governance, Malawi

1. Introduction

In the thirty years after independence from British rule, the Government of Malawi (GoM) had a highly centralized system of government. Significant changes occurred after its acquisition of multiparty democracy which came with the adoption of a new constitution based on principles of participatory democracy (Government of Malawi, 1998). A situation analysis carried out in 1993 indicated the need for an effective decentralization reform that would promote citizen participation, create effective structure at the lower levels of government, and support the process of development and poverty alleviation (Mhoni, 2008). In the year 1998 the Malawi government embarked on a decentralization policy to work as a driving force in strengthening operational efficiency and ensuring accountability of resources (Government of Malawi, as cited in Kufaine, 2008).

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