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JSL Vol 27-N1

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JSL invites the submission of manuscripts that contribute to the exchange of ideas and scholarship about schools and leadership. All theoretical and methological approaches are welcome. We do not advocate or practice a bias toward any mode of inquiry (e.g., qualitative vs. quantitative; empirical vs. conceptual; discipline-based vs. interdisciplinary) and instead operate from the assumption that all careful and methodologically sound research has the potential to contribute to our understanding of school leadership. We strongly encourage authors to consider both the local and global implications of their work. The journal’s goal is to clearly communicate with a diverse audience including both school-based and university-based educators. The journal embraces a board conception of school leadership and welcomes manuscripts that reflect the diversity of ways in which this term is understood. The journal is interested not only in manuscripts that focus on administrative leadership in schools and school districts, but also in manuscripts that inquire about teacher, student, parent, and community leadership.

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How Contexts Matter: A Framework for Understanding the Role of Contexts in Equity-Focused Educational Leadership

ePub

RACHEL ROEGMAN

How Contexts Matter

A Framework for Understanding the Role of Contexts in Equity-Focused Educational Leadership

ABSTRACT: In this article, I put forth a framework for thinking about how contexts matter. This framework highlights organizational, occupational, personal, and social contexts that influence leadership, which I illustrated with three cases of superintendents working on issues of systemic, equity-focused improvements. Data are drawn from a seven-year study of a superintendent’s network, including nine interviews with each participant. These illustrations demonstrate that different interactions between the personal, occupational, social, and organizational contexts may result in reframing, crystallizing, or negotiating what it means to lead for equity. For superintendents to engage in equity-minded reform, research and policy need to expand to consider leaders’ personal experiences as well as dominant discourses of equity.

KEY WORDS: Educational Leadership/Educational Administration, Superintendency, Equity, Contexts, School Reform

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The Role of District and School Leaders’ Trust and Communications in the Simultaneous Implementation of Innovative Policies

ePub

HAL A. LAWSON

FRANCESCA T. DURAND

KRISTEN CAMPBELL WILCOX

KAREN M. GREGORY

KATHRYN S. SCHILLER

SARAH J. ZUCKERMAN

The Role of District and School Leaders’ Trust and Communications in the Simultaneous Implementation of Innovative Policies

ABSTRACT: This mixed-method multiple case study investigated nine elementary schools. Six “odds-beating schools,” which serve relatively high numbers of economically disadvantaged children, achieved higher than predicted performance on state assessments when compared with three typically performing schools. The overarching research question guiding this study was: What forces, factors, and actors account for odds-beating schools’ better outcomes? The trust–communication connection provided one answer. Relational trust in odds-beating schools is an intraorganizational phenomenon, and it is accompanied by interorganizational trust (reciprocal trust). These two kinds of trust are accompanied by intraschool and district office–school communication mechanisms. Trust and communications are mutually constitutive as innovations are implemented. This connection is also an implementation outcome. When today’s innovation implementation initiatives reinforce this trust–communication connection, it becomes an organizational resource for future innovation implementation.

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Defining “Comparable”: An Analysis of Reduction in Force Provisions in Ohio School Districts

ePub

W. KYLE INGLE

CHRIS WILLIS

ANN HERD

Defining “Comparable”

An Analysis of Reduction in Force Provisions in Ohio School Districts

ABSTRACT: Guided by Honig and Hatch’s (2004) conceptualization of bridging and buffering, we undertook an analysis of reduction in force (RIF) provisions from 546 Ohio teacher collective bargaining agreements. We asked the following question: Are the most disadvantaged school districts providing greater protections to tenured teachers when making RIF decisions? Logistic regression analysis revealed a negative relationship (p < 0.05) between the percentage of students within the district living in poverty and bridging to state efforts to reform the use of seniority alone in RIF decisions.

KEY WORDS: Collective Bargaining, Unions, Education Policy, Human Resources

INTRODUCTION

In the United States and elsewhere, teachers may find themselves subject to reductions in force (RIF) due to reasons of financial exigency, declining enrollments, and/or school closures within the district that employs them. Historically, RIFs have been determined by seniority provisions, such that teachers with the least seniority are the first ones laid off through what have become known as last in, first out or last hired, first fired practices (Goldhaber & Theobald, 2013; National Council on Teacher Quality, 2010). RIF decisions based on seniority have both positive and negative aspects. Positive features include being simple, transparent, and requiring little discretion or judgment calls on the part of administrators. Furthermore, seniority provisions reward teachers for loyalty and long service to the school and district (National Council on Teacher Quality, 2010). Years of experience have also been identified in the teacher quality literature1 as one of the more consistent characteristics associated with student achievement gains (Harris & Rutledge, 2010; Harris & Sass, 2011; Rice 2003, 2013; Wayne & Youngs, 2003; Wilson & Floden, 2003; Wilson, Floden, & Ferrini-Mundy, 2001). However, the practice also has been criticized for not being in the interest of students or accountability goals of schools and districts (Ballou, 2000a & b; Goldhaber & Theobald, 2013; Hill, 2006; National Council on Teacher Quality, 2010). Other researchers note that while beginning teachers are likely to show improvement with additional years of experience, they can also be very effective in the classroom. As such, RIFs based on seniority alone can result in promising, beginning teachers losing their jobs while more experienced (but less effective) teachers are retained (Goldhaber & Hansen, 2010).

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Empathy Regulation Among Israeli School Principals: Expression and Suppression of Major Emotions in Educational Leadership

ePub

IZHAR OPLATKA

Empathy Regulation Among Israeli School Principals

Expression and Suppression of Major Emotions in Educational Leadership

ABSTRACT: The present study aimed to trace the ways by which Israeli principals manage their emotions at work and posed two questions: (1) How do principals tend to express empathy toward others in the school? and (2) How do principals regulate their empathy at work? Based on semi-structured interviews with 10 Israeli school principals, it was found that they are allowed, even encouraged, to display, under specific circumstances, three components of empathy: cognitive, affective (e.g., compassion), and behavioral (e.g., caring), while consciously inhibiting the expression of anger and fear publically. In addition, the principals use four strategies to regulate the components of empathy and its related emotions. Cultural, professional, and personal characteristics seem to explain empathy display and regulation among the Israeli principals.

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School Administration Manager: Redefining the Principal’s Role as an Instructional Leader

ePub

ZHAOHUI SHENG

LORA WOLFF

LLOYD KILMER

STUART YAGER

School Administration Manager

Redefining the Principal’s Role as an Instructional Leader

ABSTRACT: In response to an increasing emphasis on instructional leadership and school achievement, the School Administration Manager (SAM) model was introduced as a change strategy to release principals from managerial responsibilities so that more time can be devoted to instructional leadership. The study collected and analyzed survey and focus group interview data to evaluate the impact of SAMs on principals’ management and instructional leadership. In addition, the study examined if school level (elementary or middle school) affects the impact of SAMs. Results illustrate SAMs have a positive impact on management and instructional leadership and the impact was stronger at the middle school level.

KEY WORDS: Instructional Leadership, School Administration, School Leadership, School Level, Mixed Methods

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