Medium 9781475819595

Tep Vol 27-N4

Views: 488
Ratings: (0)

Teacher Education and Practice, a peer-refereed journal, is dedicated to the encouragement and the dissemination of research and scholarship related to professional education. The journal is concerned, in the broadest sense, with teacher preparation, practice and policy issues related to the teaching profession, as well as being concerned with learning in the school setting. The journal also serves as a forum for the exchange of diverse ideas and points of view within these purposes. As a forum, the journal offers a public space in which to critically examine current discourse and practice as well as engage in generative dialogue. Alternative forms of inquiry and representation are invited, and authors from a variety of backgrounds and diverse perspectives are encouraged to contribute. Teacher Education & Practice is published by Rowman & Littlefield.

List price: $41.99

Remix
Remove
Annual Subscriptions (4/year) Subscribe Discounts for Institutions
 

7 Articles

Format Buy Remix

Editorial: Preparing Teachers for the “Neomillennial” Generation—Rethinking the Role of Social Media

ePub

PATRICK M. JENLINK

For better or worse, Web 2.0 is reshaping our intellectual, political, and commercial landscape.

—Keen (2007, p. 185)

As teacher education students graduate and enter schools, they will bring knowledge and understanding of ways in which technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge can be combined. This will only occur if teacher education faculty members serve as effective mentors.

—Bull and colleagues (2008, p. 105)

We live in a social media–enriched world.1 The rapid advancement of social media and its applications into educational contexts is changing the spatial dynamics of teaching and learning in higher education—most important, teacher education. The role that these technologies play in learning activities has dramatically increased within higher education,2 from interaction with online learning communities and virtual worlds to e-portfolios, mobile learning, and open content; the list continues to evolve. Bartow (2014) noted that, within higher education and K–12 education alike, “social media interrupt formal education in multiple ways” (p. 36). Prevailing constructions of school, of teacher and students, and of teaching and learning are challenged.

See All Chapters

Progressive Online Teacher Education: Developing Shifts in Methodologies

ePub

VALENTINE BURR AND KARINA OTOYA-KNAPP

ABSTRACT: Online offerings across institutions of higher education are on the rise. This article examines some of the factors that are driving this increase, and it reviews the literature on emerging pedagogies of online instruction. Rooted within Bank Street College of Education’s progressive orientation, we found, in our analysis of our own online courses, a shift in methodology rather than one in pedagogy. Using a case study approach, we discuss and analyze our online teaching practices toward articulating these shifts in progressive methodology as we negotiated the differences between face-to face and online learning. The article contextualizes our online courses within the communities-of-inquiry framework. We focus on the development of the teaching, social, and cognitive presences in constructing two social justice–oriented courses on emotional and behavioral issues and language acquisition.

Online learning in higher education has expanded dramatically over the last decade. The percentage of higher education students enrolled in at least one online course has tripled, from a little less than 10% in 2003 to 32% in 2011 (Allen & Seaman, 2013, p. 19). The 2012 Babson Survey Research Group reported that while overall enrollment in U.S. higher education is in slight decline, enrollment in online courses continues to grow (Allen & Seaman, 2013). Institutions of higher education are grappling with the implications of a changing pedagogical landscape increasingly shaped by digital media.

See All Chapters

Twitter and Teacher Education: Exploring Teacher, Social, and Cognitive Presence in Professional Use of Social Media

ePub

NARELLE LEMON

ABSTRACT: Social media has been well reported for its benefit to connect individuals globally while communicating new knowledge. In the context of teacher education, however, it is underutilized and rarely researched to investigate pedagogical decisions and impact. This article shares how preservice teachers in their second year of undergraduate studies explored use of Twitter for professional links. The case demonstrates how it is possible to integrate Twitter into teacher education studies through careful planning of teacher, cognitive, and social presence while illuminating how the co-construction of knowledge through 140-character tweets supports productive, rational, and reflective thinking for preservice teachers. Of particular focus is how the preservice teachers accessed Twitter to support their lived experiences of becoming a teacher while participating in practicum in school or educational settings where theory and practice connections are made.

Twitter is one type of social media that allows for a combination of personal publishing and communication with a new type of real-time interaction. This allows for opportunities in immediate, anytime/anywhere feedback (Dunlap & Lowenthal, 2009; Lemon, 2013b; Rodens, 2011; Sinnappan & Zutshi, 2011). “Learning opportunities” (Wenger, White, & Smith, 2009, p. 9) are present with participation, while the richness that can be attained between the distinction of active and passive members is varied. Twitter participation is about dialogue—two-way and, at times, including multiple-voice discussions—that brings people together to discover and share information in an online space (Reuben, 2011; Solis, 2008). For the teacher education field, Twitter is an attractive option to support peer-to-peer interactions, student–teacher interactions, and global–student interactions about education, specific disciplines within education, and pedagogical approaches to support learning of young people. Currently, however, Twitter is under-utilized as a way to support online dialogue for preservice teachers (Lemon, 2013a, 2013b, 2014a, 2014b; Lemon, Thorneycroft, Jones, & Forner, 2012; Pestridge, 2014; Poore, 2012).

See All Chapters

Community Project: Integrating Math and Science by Using Technology

ePub

JIYOON YOON AND JOOHI LEE

ABSTRACT: This research study describes the use of emerging technologies in an innovative community engagement project and provides associated evidence of future elementary teachers’ learning. The community project enhances the community-minded thinking of the young children while serving the needs of local environmental education partners. In this project, one science method course is redesigned, and a two-semester sequence is established to link a hierarchical community engagement structure to an activity-based curriculum. In feedback on class evaluation surveys, future teachers demonstrate significant advances related to their confidence in understanding math and science concepts and teaching math and science. They respond favorably to the web-based interactive social media–sharing tool and generate meaningful community projects. Future goals include expanding the community projects across the nation and enhancing the integration of math and science with other subjects, as well as outreach through creating web-based interactive tools for national education partners.

See All Chapters

Using Twitter to Heighten Student Engagement, Critical Thinking, and Reflective Practice Within and Beyond the Classroom

ePub

CRYSTAL MACHADO AND YING JIANG

ABSTRACT: This article describes the growing popularity of social media and the influence that Twitter, a microblogging social media tool, is having across disciplines in general and the field of education in particular. Five vignettes illustrate how a university professor is using Twitter to engage preservice and in-service education professionals across three programs—in critical thinking and reflective practice and in both the classroom and the field. K–12 and higher education faculty are invited to explore the pedagogical possibilities of Twitter in their own classrooms.

Look at these numbers: Facebook has 1.23 billion monthly active users, and its monthly active mobile users totaled 945 million as of December 31, 2013.1 Twitter has more than 288 million monthly active visitors, with 400 million tweets being sent per day. Forty percent of marketers use Google+; 70% desire to learn more; and 67% plan to increase Google+ activities. Every second, 8,000 users like some photo on Instagram. In sum, 4.2 billion people use a mobile device to access social media sites.2 Undoubtedly, social media is greatly influencing the way that we live, think, and communicate. With every passing day, it is luring people from different backgrounds into a large network that connects everyone.

See All Chapters

A Peek Behind the Page: How Preservice Teachers Use Social Media to Build Understanding and Community

ePub

DONNA H. COX AND LAUTRICE M. NICKSON

ABSTRACT: Twenty-three preservice teachers in a literacy methods block created an outside-of-class Facebook page during the time that their instructor took a 6-week leave of absence. The purpose of this study was not only to examine the phenomenon of the development of the preservice teachers’ Facebook page but also to examine what their comments may say about the kinds of information, scaffolding, support, and motivation they feel they need to be successful in their courses. The most common types of discussion that emerged from the posts were requests, clarifications, sharing, organizing, and encouragement. Analysis of the posts suggest that instructors might recommend that students develop their own Facebook page for class support; offer frequent updates or reminders via e-mail of pending assignments; add a question/answer link on their course webpage whereby students may communicate informally with one another about questions or concerns over coursework.

See All Chapters

Digital Learning in Education: The Means for Societal Change in an Antieducation Era

ePub

The Anti-Education Era: Creating Smarter Students Through Digital Learning , by James Paul Gee

(Palgrave Macmillan, 2013), 240 pp., $17.00 (paper), ISBN 978-0-230-34209

Can Education Change Society? by Michael W. Apple

(Routledge, 2013), 170 pp., $36.95 (paper), ISBN 978-0-415-87533-2

AUDREY L. “LAURIE ” CURTIS

At first glance, it is probably apparent why a review of James Paul Gee’s book The Anti-Education Era: Creating Smarter Students Through Digital Learning (2013) would be included in a publication focusing on social media and teacher preparation. The rationale for including Michael W. Apple’s book Can Education Change Society? (2013) may not be so evident. A careful reading and analysis, however, find that the books share many themes in support of a common goal: reforming the education system to make it more democratic and to give voice to all learners, not just the ones who have historically had standing. Despite the vast differences in the styles of these two critical scholars, both authors share the belief that education can and should do something about inequalities in education and society at large through care, connections, and collaboration.

See All Chapters

Details

Print Book
E-Books
Articles

Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Sku
IPE0000195053
Isbn
9781475819595
File size
3.34 MB
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Format name
ePub
Encrypted
No
Printing
Allowed
Copying
Allowed
Read aloud
Allowed
Sku
In metadata
Isbn
In metadata
File size
In metadata