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Medium 9781475824254

Notes From the Editor

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Notes From the Editor

Susan C. Bon

Reflected in this issue is a variety of articles. For those who are either new to this journal or are existing readers, please be apprised that the journal has expanded the scope of articles considered and did so to be better competitive in the changing market for scholarly articles having important information for public school public relations personnel. Specifically, to quote our expanded focus as published on the web (see https://rowman.com/Page/JSPR) as well as on the first page of each journal, articles are solicited that address six critical areas in public school and higher education administration: public relations, school and community relations, community education, communication, conflict management/resolution, and human resources management.

Contained in this edition is an article titled “Elevating the Conversation: Relationships, Systems, and Schools,” by Kelly Wachel, a public information officer, that describes how low-performing urban schools can improve student achievement by following a systematic plan of action designed to negate negative perceptions. According to the systematic plan, school public relations officers should focus initially on the perceptions of students and on their values relative to their accountability for learning. To either reinforce or alter these values toward academic achievement, she advocates the involvement of other stakeholders, including parents, other high-achieving school districts, community leaders, and future employers. Specific attention is given to how to create a safe environment as well as an appealing environment where attention is focused on the school’s physical facility because most people judge a book by its cover.

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Medium 9781475811537

The Inner Life of Transformation: A Philosophic Investigation of Leadership, Media, Justice, and Freedom

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

GLENN M. HUDAK

ABSTRACT: This article investigates the philosophical terrain of transformational leadership by first providing a phenomenology of school leadership within the context of a media-saturated environment. Second, the article investigates transformational leadership by comparing and contrasting leadership in Plato's Republic with leadership in postmodern America.

We live in an age of “transformation” where freedom to transform ourselves has become a cultural preoccupation at the expense of justice. As such, it is no mere coincidence that “transformation” should also become a prominent conceptual feature in leadership theory. This is not to suggest that research into transformational leadership is misguided. Rather, in this study I will focus on the construction of “transformation” within the contemporary social context, and especially within the context of the postmodern media environment. In my investigation I will differentiate between transformation that speaks primarily to our organizational needs—needs that pertain to our work lives—and “inner” transformation, transformation that awakens not only our inner, psychic, and spiritual lives but, more so, our moral impulse for justice. My aim is to bring into “ecological” balance the realities of our work lives with the necessities of our inner lives as they pertain to a meaningful process of transformation. Indeed, it is my contention that while noteworthy leadership studies address the importance of transformation within the organizational contexts of schools (e.g., Bennis, 1984; Burns, 1978; Quantz, Rogers, & Dantley, 1991), without proper attention to the inner life of transformation, our social, political, and organizational efforts may, in fact, be colluding with the dominant ideology rather than providing an oppositional frame that sets the stage to transform injustice to justice.

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Medium 9781442229211

Christ, the Spirit, and Vocation: Initial Reflections on a Pentecostal Ecclesiology

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Christ, the Spirit, and Vocation: Initial Reflections on a Pentecostal Ecclesiology

Dale M. Coulter

In recent years Pentecostal theologians have begun to address what some had considered a lacuna in Pentecostalism: its doctrine of the church. The issue over whether or not early Pentecostals neglected this doctrine has not deterred a flurry of creative proposals. A diversity of models are emerging from variations of a free-church, communio ecclesiology (Volf, Kärkkäinen, Yong, and Macchia) to an endorsement of a hierarchically structured model (Chan).1 Thus far, much of the theological reflection on the doctrine of the church has come from the free-church wing of Pentecostalism with little from those within the episcopal wing.2 This free-church dominance explains, at least in part, why Pentecostal theologians usually begin their reflections with a comment on the dearth of ecclesiological writings in the early days of the movement, which ignores the extensive debate about the nature of the church that occurred within the episcopal wing.3

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Medium 9781442229044

ECUMENICAL TASKS IN RELATIONSHIP TO THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Wolfhart Pannenberg



The current state of ecumenical dialogue between the churches of the Reformation and Rome, and between the Lutheran churches and Rome, is not encouraging. A few years ago things were different. With the signing of the Official Common Statement of the Lutheran-Catholic Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification in 1999, there was some hope that an understanding on the other doctrinal differences that exist between Rome and the churches of the Reformation had become possible. Based on the German study of sixteenth-century condemnations—published under the title Lehrverurteilungen—kirchentrennend? in 1994 and subsequently accepted, although not without some reservation, by the responsible ecclesial committees on the Lutheran side—these doctrinal differences included two other important topics in addition to justification, namely, the doctrines of the sacraments and ministry. The results of the Condemnation Study regarding the topic of justification were received and affirmed beyond Germany—that is, internationally—by the Lutheran World Federation and the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity. Yet, in many German Protestant circles this reception and affirmation was met with a lack of understanding, primarily because they had expected a direct, reciprocal reaction by Rome to the positive reception of the Condemnation Study results by German ecclesial committees. This expectation was not realistic in large part because the consensus reached in Germany was initially only a regionally adopted result. A statement by the whole Roman Catholic Church would have required an international consensus. With respect to the doctrine of justification, such a consensus had been reached through the Declaration on Justification worked out by the Lutheran World Federation and the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity. As for the other two topics—the doctrine of sacraments, in particular the Eucharist, as well as ordained ministry—no corresponding international reception has, as yet, been forthcoming, even though that would have been in keeping with the logic of the process begun by the Condemnation Study and the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification.

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Medium 9781475811957

Stress in School Administration: Coping Tips for Principals

R&L Education ePub

OLUSEGUN AGBOOLA SOGUNRO

ABSTRACT: With the need for rapid school reform amid changes in socioeconomic and political situations, evidence abounds that today’s school principals operate in a stress-strained environment. Participants of this study identified at least a form of stress on the job. More than 96% claimed to have experienced work-related stress at a level they believed was affecting their mental and physical health, work habits, and productivity. With continuous frustrations and challenges, many principals are thinking of quitting or seeking early retirement. The seven major stress factors identified were unpleasant relationships and people conflicts, time constraints and related issues, crises in the school, challenging policy demands and overwhelming mandates, budgetary constraints and related issues, fear of failure, and negative publicity and dealing with media. Coping tips were explicated from the perspectives of behavioral modification cues, physical exercises, relaxation techniques, professional help, and medical care. Through interviews with 52 principals in Connecticut for about 2.5 years, this article brings to the fore various causes of stress in school administration as well as some coping techniques for principals. Implications for school districts, enhanced leadership preparation practices, and further research are also discussed.

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