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Medium 9781475817270

Dilemmas of Assistant Principals in Their Supervisory Role: Reflections of an Assistant Principal

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

JEFFREY GLANZ1

ABSTRACT: Attention is focused, in this article, on the dilemmas of the supervisory role and the shift from a bureaucratic to a collegial culture. This article, based on practitioner reflection, provides anecdotal evidence to support the move from a bureaucratic culture to a collegial one. The author documents a basic conflict he has experienced which hindered his ability to function effectively. Specifically, the article explores an unresolved dilemma between the necessity to evaluate and the desire to genuinely assist teachers in the instructional process. This problem, although seemingly intractable, can, in fact be mitigated through more collaborative efforts which strive to foster participatory democratic leadership. These efforts are discussed.

Public education has received much criticism (Johnson, 1990; Katz. 1987; Sizer, 1984). Particularly over the last several years. Various committees and commissions have highlighted the dire state of public education. As a result of the scrutiny into educational policy and practice, research into effective or quality schooling has proceeded at a feverish pace. Research has indicated several important factors that contribute to effective schooling (see, for example, Blase and Kirby, 1992). Much of this literature has focused on the principalship as vital for successful school reform (see, for example, Lipham, Rankin, and Hoeh, Jr., 1985; Lucio and McNeil, 1969). Less attention, however, has been given to the role and function of the assistant principal (Gorton and Ketterman, 1985).

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Medium 9781475812534

Blind Spots: Small Rural Communities and High Turnover in the Superintendency

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Barry Kamrath

C. Cryss Brunner

Blind Spots: Small Rural Communities and High Turnover in the Superintendency

ABSTRACT: This article examines high superintendency turnover through rural community members’ perceptions of such attrition in their districts. Findings indicate that community members perceived high turnover as negative and believed that turnover was created by financial pressures, rural community resistance to educational trends, and bias against minorities and/or “outsiders.” Interestingly, most community members talked about superintendent turnover as “just the way things are around here,” attributing high turnover to what they considered external financial conditions (the superintendents’ low salary and the state funding sources) and unwittingly putting themselves in a position of helplessness, or as victims, even when they controlled the amount of salary that they offered candidates.

Historically, many small rural school districts have been unable to retain superintendents long-term, leaving schools without the consistent top leadership needed to meet contemporary educational challenges. In most smaller rural school districts, superintendents often go without the layers of administrative supports found in larger districts; therefore, they become deeply involved in, and often solely responsible for, district change initiatives. Working closely with school principals and teachers, superintendents in small rural school districts are viewed by many community stakeholders to be vital to the success of their schools. Without continuity of vision, priorities, or expectations, superintendent turnover can leave these communities in turmoil, with frustrated school staff members who become resistant to the change efforts of future leaders.

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Medium 9781442267763

Welcome New Editorial Board Members

Collections; Juilee Decker AltaMira Press ePub

As a peer-reviewed, quarterly publication from AltaMira Press, Collections offers a platform for research, dialogue, and reportage among professionals — at every stage. The journal strives to offer professional guidance and theoretical grounding drawn from fields such as anthropology, art history, cultural studies, ethnobotany, history, conservation, law, life science, museum studies, and library science.

The publication process is a collaborative venture: the Editor; AltaMira Press and its parent company, Rowman and Littlefield; and authors contribute to and benefit from the journal in a range of capacities. Additionally, the Editorial Board plays a key role in the publication process and the success of the journal. Working closely with me in my role as editor of the journal, board members will help to achieve the journal’s mission and, moreover, contribute to the journal in a variety of ways. Key among these are peer review and guest editorship. In addition, members of the Editorial Board develop concepts for themed issues of the journal; encourage submissions from a range of museum and archives professionals; identify books, symposia, conferences, and projects for review or proceedings publication; assist the editor in keeping abreast of trends and issues in the field; and broaden the discourse about collections to our national and international readership. Names of the Editorial Board are proudly featured on the journal’s website and in each issue of the journal.

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Medium 9781475837568

Evaluating Engagement in Inclusive Science Classrooms for Students with Disabilities Using a Guided Science Inquiry Approach Jonte C. Taylor, James D. Stocker, William Therrien, and Brian Hand

Journal of Evidence-Based Practices for Schools Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

Evaluating Engagement in Inclusive Science Classrooms for Students with Disabilities Using a Guided Science Inquiry Approach

Jonte C. Taylor

James D. Stocker

William Therrien

Brian Hand

ABSTRACT: Academic engagement is an essential behavior that students must demonstrate as the foundation of learning. This is especially important in inquiry-based science classrooms where instructional progress can happen at a rapid pace. For students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms, on-task engagement can be difficult and contribute to poor academic performance in science. Research on the effectiveness of inquiry-based science instructional practices for students with disabilities has been limited. Equally limited has been research examining academic engagement in science classrooms. The current study examines the effect of an inquiry-based instructional approach for science (Science Writing Heuristic, SWH) on classroom engagement for students with disabilities in inclusive science classrooms. Results suggest that the SWH approach is effective in keeping students engaged during science instruction.

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Medium 9781475823899

Legal Issues in Educating Students With Disabilities

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers ePub

GERARD A. FOWLER

AMANDA L. RAINEY

ABSTRACT: Since the passing of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, Americans With Disabilities Act, and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, public and private schools have had to adapt the ways in which they provide education and services to their students and communities. It is essential for school public relations professionals to be familiar and conversant in legal issues relating to individuals with disabilities and the way in which the educational system supports them. This article offers background information on prominent legislation, requirements for schools, and successful strategies for handling disciplinary actions, by reviewing recent case law and legislation.

Since the passing of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (1973), the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA; 1991), and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), public and private schools have had to adapt the ways in which they provide education and services to their students and communities. As such, it is essential for school public relations professionals to be familiar and conversant in legal issues relating to individuals with disabilities and the way in which the educational system supports them. This article offers information on prominent legislation and requirements for schools, specifically examining Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, ADA, and IDEA. More important, it offers successful strategies for school public relations professionals in working with administrators, media, students, and parents. School public relations professionals will be able to utilize this information to communicate effectively with other administrators, media, parents, and community members about the role of the school in educating persons with a disability.

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